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stan_solo

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« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2016, 09:39:49 AM »
AMD : Vega Graphic cards

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There’s been quite a bit going on in the AMD camp this past day or so, and if true it certainly answers the concerns we’ve had about AMD letting Nvidia dominate the high-end graphics card market for the last year. According to sources closed to AMD, its Vega 10 GPU is due to arrive in early 2017 and Vega 20 sometime after. On the basis of the leaked specs, they’re going to be a pair of absolute monsters.

First, the Vega 10. This is on target for a Q1 2017 launch and has, wait for it - 12 teraflops of single floating point performance. The GTX 1080 has 8.9 TFLOPs, for point of reference. It will allegedly be manufactured on the new 14nm GFX9 architecture, with 4096 cores over 64 Compute Units. 16GB of HBM2 memory provides total memory bandwidth of 512 GB/s. On paper it sounds like it should be able to blow just about anything else out there away. That is, until the dual GPU Vega 10 arrives in Q2 2017. Double the performance and I expect it to be double the (undisclosed) price.

Both the Vega 10 and dual Vega 10 should be quite power hungry, with the former having an expected TDP of 225W and the latter 300W.

Following on from this, and perhaps where things get even more interesting, is AMD’s Vega 20 GPU. This will be a generational leap, shrinking the process down to 7nm while retaining the GFX9 architecture seen with the Vega 10. The Vega 20 GPU will double memory up to 32GB of HBM2, providing 1TB/s memory bandwidth. It’ll also support PCI Express 4.0 as standard. That process shrink means AMD can once more make strides forward in performance efficiency, with a current target TDP of ~150W.

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stan_solo

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« Reply #16 on: September 27, 2016, 09:47:28 AM »
SAMSUNG  :  960 M2 SSD

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While I’m sat here with my poxy SSHD, Samsung is making some incredible gains in the world of SSDs. It’s just unveiled its next generation of M.2 PCIe SSDs - the Samsung 960 Pro and the 960 Evo. And they’re fast. Really fast. The Samsung 960 Pro tops out with a 3.5GB/s read speed and a peak of 2.1GB/s write.

The Samsung 960 Evo is no slouch either, offering up speeds of 3.2GB/s and 1.9GB/s for read and write respectively. Stack this up against some of Samsung’s standard SSD offerings, such as the ever popular 850 Evo, and it absolutely trounces it. The 850 Evo offers read and write speeds of just 540 MB/s and 520 MB/s.
If you’re unfamiliar with M.2 form factor storage, these are basically SSD sticks which plug straight into the PCI Express slot on your motherboard for lightning fast data transfers.

Compared to last year’s Samsung M.2 SSDs, this latest range also excels in terms of storage. The previous maximum capacity was 512GB for the 950 Pro. This has now been quadrupled, up to 2TB for the 960 Pro.

All the best toys never come cheap though, so you’d best bust out the chequebook if you’re thinking of picking either of these up. The 960 Pro is priced at $329 for 512GB, or an eye-watering $1,299 for the 2TB model. Fortunately the slower speeds mean the 960 Evo is a much more reasonable proposition. The 250Gb model is available for a bit of a snip at $129, while the 1TB version can be had for $479.

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stan_solo

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« Reply #17 on: September 30, 2016, 09:52:03 AM »
NVIDIA : Pascal 2.0  Graphic cards

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While AMD has plenty of exciting stuff in the pipeline with regards to its next-gen Vega GPU, 2017 is looking a little more conservative for Nvidia, at least at this early stage. According to fresh reports, next year Nvidia will introduce a Pascal refresh before following up with the true next-gen Volta in 2018.

The Pascal refresh will allegedly reuse the same Pascal GPUs, such as the GP102 which was used for the GeForce GTX 1080 and the Titan X Pascal. Nvidia has chosen to refine this GPU rather than move to an all new product. This is much like the jump from the Nvidia GTX 600 series to the GTX 700 series, so expect to see Pascal shift from 16nm FinFET down to the 14nm FinFET node, bringing with it moderate performance (clock speed) and efficiency improvements, as well as driving down the price.

It also seems likely that the higher-speed GDDR5X might begin to find its way into more of the GTX 11 family than we’ve got with the current 10 Series. At the moment only the GTX 1080 and Titan X Pascal benefit from the higher speed memory, with the rumoured GTX 1080 Ti utilising bog-standard GDDR5.

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stan_solo

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« Reply #18 on: September 30, 2016, 09:54:34 AM »
NVIDIA  : Volta Graphic cards

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Like honey out a beehive it has been reliably leaked that Nvidia CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang, is set to take the stage and introduce the latest Volta GPU Architecture at GTC 2017 next Spring. Rumours aside, we know for certain that, like Pascal, the chip will be aimed at HPC, yet this time will feature faster and higher capacity HBM2 memory. But it’s the rumours where thing really get exciting.

It is expected that Nvidia will drop the previously expected 10nm fabrication process in preference for 7nm for its new Volta GPUs. Support for the yet-be-revealed HBM3 (High Bandwidth Memory) and GDDR6 is also expected, beginning at 16GB as standard. The much faster GDDR6 memory is capable of more than 14Gbps bandwidth, compared to 10Gbps on GDDR5X and just 8Gbps on GDDR5.

Another key benefit of GDDR6 is its reduced power consumption. Memory is normally quite a resource hog on any GPU, yet increased efficiency means we could be seeing Volta-based graphics cards with as much as 48GB GDDR6 memory.

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DivotMaker

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« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2016, 02:43:00 PM »
Finally getting away from the Red Team for a while as we wait to see if they execute on their Vega lineup in response to nVidia's lineup early next year.

Just bought an EVGA GTX 1080 FTW 8GB and will put it in this afternoon replacing my AMD Nano 4 GB. I plan to use EVGA's Step Up program to trade up to the next refresh of the Paschal lineup for the difference in sales price only. Great program. I'll try to post some of the differences I see here later.
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mebby

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« Reply #20 on: October 03, 2016, 05:15:27 PM »
Finally getting away from the Red Team for a while as we wait to see if they execute on their Vega lineup in response to nVidia's lineup early next year.

Just bought an EVGA GTX 1080 FTW 8GB and will put it in this afternoon replacing my AMD Nano 4 GB. I plan to use EVGA's Step Up program to trade up to the next refresh of the Paschal lineup for the difference in sales price only. Great program. I'll try to post some of the differences I see here later.

Love my GTX 1080.  It's literally a GPU that you plug in and just forget about because it will run anything that's thrown at it with complete ease!
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stan_solo

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« Reply #21 on: October 03, 2016, 07:18:59 PM »
INTEL  :  Kaby Lake processor

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What appears to be the first legit benchmarks for Intel’s upcoming Intel Core i7-7700K appear to have leaked. Built on the new Kaby Lake architecture, the Intel Core i7-7700K represents a refinement of the 14nm process that pushes performance much more than we’d anticipated. These early Geekbench benchmarks showcase as much as 40% performance gains over the previous generation.
In terms of specs the upcoming core i7-7700K is quad-core CPU with eight threads, clocked at 4.2 GHz base clock and 4.5 GHz boost. It uses the same LGA 1151 socket as Skylake and draws on 95W TDP.

We’ve got no confirmed details on pricing yet for the Intel Core i7-7700K, but it’s expected to fall in line with the cost of the 6700K during its launch. We’re therefore looking at ~$339. With a chip already out here in the wild, I’d hazard a guess we’re not too far away from the launch of Kaby Lake.

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DivotMaker

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« Reply #22 on: October 04, 2016, 12:48:01 PM »
Finally getting away from the Red Team for a while as we wait to see if they execute on their Vega lineup in response to nVidia's lineup early next year.

Just bought an EVGA GTX 1080 FTW 8GB and will put it in this afternoon replacing my AMD Nano 4 GB. I plan to use EVGA's Step Up program to trade up to the next refresh of the Paschal lineup for the difference in sales price only. Great program. I'll try to post some of the differences I see here later.

Love my GTX 1080.  It's literally a GPU that you plug in and just forget about because it will run anything that's thrown at it with complete ease!

It is a beast.....literally double the framerates as the Nano, but initially it was very jerky. I figured out that my monitor was still set on FreeSync which does not work with nVidia cards. I switched it off and it was smooth as a baby's butt. Next purchase for me is a 34 or 35" GSync monitor at 3440x1440......
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RockManDan

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« Reply #23 on: October 04, 2016, 05:14:58 PM »
You may want to consider a 4K TV for a monitor.  The prices have been coming down quite a bit and then it can serve double duty as a tv.  I have this set up in my bedroom and wouldn't go any other way.
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mebby

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« Reply #24 on: October 04, 2016, 05:25:24 PM »
You may want to consider a 4K TV for a monitor.  The prices have been coming down quite a bit and then it can serve double duty as a tv.  I have this set up in my bedroom and wouldn't go any other way.

I did this as well.  I've got my PC connected to a 65" 4K TV and it's pretty sweet.
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stan_solo

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« Reply #25 on: October 05, 2016, 08:26:56 AM »
AMD  :  Zen processors

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CES 2017 in January is shaping up to be a heck of an event for gaming hardware lovers. Reportedly joining the expected launch of the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is AMD with its next-generation Zen desktop CPUs due to drop at the very same show.

The first few Zen CPUs should begin trickling out around about January 5-8, but mass availability isn’t expected until March.

Manufactured on the 14nm FinFET fabrication process, Zen is AMD’s first true competitor in years to Intel’s dominance in the CPU market. All high-end Summit Ridge ‘Zen’ CPUs will come with dual channel DDR4 support and PCI Express 3.0 support. Performance is going to vary across the entire Zen family, but the most expensive chip will be a genuine octa-core CPU with 16 threads. Drawing on 95 TDP, we’re expecting this to be quite the performer.

Ahead of Zen’s arrival, the first high-end AM4 socket X370 motherboards are due to begin shipping in December. The full complement of mobos should be out and about by the time Zen hits

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DivotMaker

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« Reply #26 on: October 07, 2016, 04:03:45 PM »
Finally getting away from the Red Team for a while as we wait to see if they execute on their Vega lineup in response to nVidia's lineup early next year.

Just bought an EVGA GTX 1080 FTW 8GB and will put it in this afternoon replacing my AMD Nano 4 GB. I plan to use EVGA's Step Up program to trade up to the next refresh of the Paschal lineup for the difference in sales price only. Great program. I'll try to post some of the differences I see here later.

Love my GTX 1080.  It's literally a GPU that you plug in and just forget about because it will run anything that's thrown at it with complete ease!

It is a beast.....literally double the framerates as the Nano, but initially it was very jerky. I figured out that my monitor was still set on FreeSync which does not work with nVidia cards. I switched it off and it was smooth as a baby's butt. Next purchase for me is a 34 or 35" GSync monitor at 3440x1440......

Not sure what happened, but I ended up returning the 1080. I was not seeing the performance I was expecting. It was faster than my Nano, but not 100% faster by any stretch. In fact it was about 10-15% faster in PG and TGC and for $750 I expected more.

So I retrained the card to Fry's and upgraded my monitor to a 34" LG 3440x1440 Curved Freesync monitor and the difference from my previous LG 34" non-curved Freesync monitor is staggering in both looks, ergonomics and the performance is much better than was expecting. Image quality is stunning as it is 4K WQHD. As soon as I get my Radeon Pro Duo (two Nano's on one board that in most benchmarks is running 25-40% faster than a GTX 1080) I will be in good shape until AMD releases their Vega beat in Q2 2017.
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mebby

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« Reply #27 on: October 07, 2016, 06:29:24 PM »
Finally getting away from the Red Team for a while as we wait to see if they execute on their Vega lineup in response to nVidia's lineup early next year.

Just bought an EVGA GTX 1080 FTW 8GB and will put it in this afternoon replacing my AMD Nano 4 GB. I plan to use EVGA's Step Up program to trade up to the next refresh of the Paschal lineup for the difference in sales price only. Great program. I'll try to post some of the differences I see here later.

Love my GTX 1080.  It's literally a GPU that you plug in and just forget about because it will run anything that's thrown at it with complete ease!

It is a beast.....literally double the framerates as the Nano, but initially it was very jerky. I figured out that my monitor was still set on FreeSync which does not work with nVidia cards. I switched it off and it was smooth as a baby's butt. Next purchase for me is a 34 or 35" GSync monitor at 3440x1440......

Not sure what happened, but I ended up returning the 1080. I was not seeing the performance I was expecting. It was faster than my Nano, but not 100% faster by any stretch. In fact it was about 10-15% faster in PG and TGC and for $750 I expected more.

So I retrained the card to Fry's and upgraded my monitor to a 34" LG 3440x1440 Curved Freesync monitor and the difference from my previous LG 34" non-curved Freesync monitor is staggering in both looks, ergonomics and the performance is much better than was expecting. Image quality is stunning as it is 4K WQHD. As soon as I get my Radeon Pro Duo (two Nano's on one board that in most benchmarks is running 25-40% faster than a GTX 1080) I will be in good shape until AMD releases their Vega beat in Q2 2017.

Wow.  I'm surprised that you didn't see the improvement that you were looking for.  I was coming from a GTX 970 and the improvement is awesome.  Plus, it's super quiet.  I'm not sure I've even made the fan come on more than once yet!
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stan_solo

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« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2016, 07:39:50 PM »
So I retrained the card to Fry's and upgraded my monitor to a 34" LG 3440x1440 Curved Freesync monitor and the difference from my previous LG 34" non-curved Freesync monitor is staggering in both looks, ergonomics and the performance is much better than was expecting.

ASUS  :  LCD monitor

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I don’t know how many hertz is too many hertz, but ASUS is marching onwards with reinventing high refresh rate monitors. Its latest, the ASUS ROG Swift PG258Q gaming monitor, boasts a refresh rate of 240Hz. This makes it world’s first commercially available LCD monitor with a refresh rate that high.
Mercifully it’s a 1920 x 1080 resolution display, meaning those with high-end graphics cards may actually begin to hope of achieving frame rates as high as 240 FPS. I'd hazard a guess it's only really going to come in truly useful when playing older, less demanding competitive games. CSGO stands out as a prime example.

The monitor itself is PG258Q is 24.5” so it’s not overly huge, and comes packing a 1ms response time. It may not necessarily make games look the best but it’ll certainly help them play the best and it’s sure to be a nifty display for those who want to get the edge in some eSports.
On the inside the ASUS ROG Swift PG258Q is equipped with Nvidia G-Sync technology to prevent screen tearing and frame rate stutters.

There's no pricing on the ROG Swift PG258Q yet but I'd expect it be some pretty expensive gear, likely in the $600 / £500+ range. Look out for in stores in early 2017.

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Yes I know 'only' 1080 P

Personally I like the LG 65"  OLED  4K HDR  telly   .... but it's a whopping  £6000 for the top model

RockManDan

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« Reply #29 on: October 07, 2016, 08:26:07 PM »
My 65" Vizio 4K also has a refresh rate of 240hz.  I could have save $200 if I'd gone with the 120 version.
i9 9900k 8 Core 5.O GHz. 
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