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stan_solo

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« Reply #30 on: October 08, 2016, 10:47:48 AM »
SHARP  :  8K  monitor

On the subject of TV's and monitors  ... look at this  ... 8K as well !

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Here I am sat on my miserly 1080p / 60Hz display, while over in Japan electronics specialist Sharp has been showing off a 27” 8K monitor. It doesn’t end there either, because it’s also running with a 120Hz refresh rate and is HDR-capable. Good job I’m wearing a bib writing about this.
The no doubt horrendously expensive monitor was on display at CEATEC Japan 2016. Running at 8K means it’ll require a graphics card capable of 7680 x 4320 resolution (four times the number of pixels as 4K), so it’s probably a little out of reach unless you’re packing some quad-SLI monster
The screen itself is an IGZO IPS panel. That’s a new one to me but it’s apparently the materials used to construct the panel - indium, gallium, zinc and oxygen, so there you go.
I have to say I’m impressed this display manages to pump out at 120Hz refresh rate at such a ridiculous resolution. Actually being able to take advantage of that is a different matter entirely though. Considering there’s basically no monitors out there with HDR support it’s nice to see that creep in as well. That’s definitely likely to be a more prominent feature in PC monitors going forward, particularly as demand for the feature rises.

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RockManDan

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« Reply #31 on: October 08, 2016, 11:20:08 AM »
I agree with your last statement.  It's just like with PCs. 
At some point you just get to where the upgrades mean less and less in real life application. Do I really need to see if Angelina Jolie had a zit on her face while she was filming my favorite move...Wanted?  Not really.... can I appreciate the beauty of what I do see?  Absolutely.
I can already see the natural color of landscapes, the color variations of a butterfly, the sweat running down an athlete's face.
I know some of you are really pumped for the VR, and it's cool and everything...... but there will be something better coming down the pike next year that will blow it out of the water and they'll become junk on the shelf.  Probably something like a helmet that will allow side views without moving your head and 3D sound.
As long as we have money in or pockets something is always going to be "new" or "better".  Thats how they put our money in their pockets.  Is it really worth it?
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DivotMaker

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« Reply #32 on: October 08, 2016, 11:31:25 AM »
I agree with your last statement.  It's just like with PCs. 
At some point you just get to where the upgrades mean less and less in real life application. Do I really need to see if Angelina Jolie had a zit on her face while she was filming my favorite move...Wanted?  Not really.... can I appreciate the beauty of what I do see?  Absolutely.
I can already see the natural color of landscapes, the color variations of a butterfly, the sweat running down an athlete's face.
I know some of you are really pumped for the VR, and it's cool and everything...... but there will be something better coming down the pike next year that will blow it out of the water and they'll become junk on the shelf.  Probably something like a helmet that will allow side views without moving your head and 3D sound.
As long as we have money in or pockets something is always going to be "new" or "better".  Thats how they put our money in their pockets.  Is it really worth it?

Think Star Trek Holodeck...... ;)
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RockManDan

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« Reply #33 on: October 08, 2016, 11:42:49 AM »
I agree with your last statement.  It's just like with PCs. 
At some point you just get to where the upgrades mean less and less in real life application. Do I really need to see if Angelina Jolie had a zit on her face while she was filming my favorite move...Wanted?  Not really.... can I appreciate the beauty of what I do see?  Absolutely.
I can already see the natural color of landscapes, the color variations of a butterfly, the sweat running down an athlete's face.
I know some of you are really pumped for the VR, and it's cool and everything...... but there will be something better coming down the pike next year that will blow it out of the water and they'll become junk on the shelf.  Probably something like a helmet that will allow side views without moving your head and 3D sound.
As long as we have money in or pockets something is always going to be "new" or "better".  Thats how they put our money in their pockets.  Is it really worth it?

Think Star Trek Holodeck...... ;)
NOW THAT WOULD BE AWESOME !!!
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jcauthen04

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« Reply #34 on: October 08, 2016, 10:13:28 PM »
Finally getting away from the Red Team for a while as we wait to see if they execute on their Vega lineup in response to nVidia's lineup early next year.

Just bought an EVGA GTX 1080 FTW 8GB and will put it in this afternoon replacing my AMD Nano 4 GB. I plan to use EVGA's Step Up program to trade up to the next refresh of the Paschal lineup for the difference in sales price only. Great program. I'll try to post some of the differences I see here later.

Love my GTX 1080.  It's literally a GPU that you plug in and just forget about because it will run anything that's thrown at it with complete ease!

It is a beast.....literally double the framerates as the Nano, but initially it was very jerky. I figured out that my monitor was still set on FreeSync which does not work with nVidia cards. I switched it off and it was smooth as a baby's butt. Next purchase for me is a 34 or 35" GSync monitor at 3440x1440......

Not sure what happened, but I ended up returning the 1080. I was not seeing the performance I was expecting. It was faster than my Nano, but not 100% faster by any stretch. In fact it was about 10-15% faster in PG and TGC and for $750 I expected more.

So I retrained the card to Fry's and upgraded my monitor to a 34" LG 3440x1440 Curved Freesync monitor and the difference from my previous LG 34" non-curved Freesync monitor is staggering in both looks, ergonomics and the performance is much better than was expecting. Image quality is stunning as it is 4K WQHD. As soon as I get my Radeon Pro Duo (two Nano's on one board that in most benchmarks is running 25-40% faster than a GTX 1080) I will be in good shape until AMD releases their Vega beat in Q2 2017.

Puzzling results you got with the GTX 1080... I compared your current card to the EVGA 1080 FTW 8GB, and according to Game Debate's comparison app, you should have seen 56% faster frame rates out of the 1080.  Here's a link if anyone's interested:

http://www.game-debate.com/gpu/index.php?gid=3554&gid2=3081&compare=geforce-gtx-1080-evga-ftw-acx-3-0-8gb-edition-vs-radeon-r9-nano-4gb

I know the three cards I've bought in the last two years have yielded almost exactly the performance boost in both JNPG and TGC that the comparison chart predicted.  Weren't you originally seeing almost double the frame rates after you took your monitor out of freesync mode?  I'm just wondering what could have happened?
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DivotMaker

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« Reply #35 on: October 09, 2016, 09:23:53 AM »
Finally getting away from the Red Team for a while as we wait to see if they execute on their Vega lineup in response to nVidia's lineup early next year.

Just bought an EVGA GTX 1080 FTW 8GB and will put it in this afternoon replacing my AMD Nano 4 GB. I plan to use EVGA's Step Up program to trade up to the next refresh of the Paschal lineup for the difference in sales price only. Great program. I'll try to post some of the differences I see here later.

Love my GTX 1080.  It's literally a GPU that you plug in and just forget about because it will run anything that's thrown at it with complete ease!

It is a beast.....literally double the framerates as the Nano, but initially it was very jerky. I figured out that my monitor was still set on FreeSync which does not work with nVidia cards. I switched it off and it was smooth as a baby's butt. Next purchase for me is a 34 or 35" GSync monitor at 3440x1440......

Not sure what happened, but I ended up returning the 1080. I was not seeing the performance I was expecting. It was faster than my Nano, but not 100% faster by any stretch. In fact it was about 10-15% faster in PG and TGC and for $750 I expected more.

So I retrained the card to Fry's and upgraded my monitor to a 34" LG 3440x1440 Curved Freesync monitor and the difference from my previous LG 34" non-curved Freesync monitor is staggering in both looks, ergonomics and the performance is much better than was expecting. Image quality is stunning as it is 4K WQHD. As soon as I get my Radeon Pro Duo (two Nano's on one board that in most benchmarks is running 25-40% faster than a GTX 1080) I will be in good shape until AMD releases their Vega beat in Q2 2017.

Puzzling results you got with the GTX 1080... I compared your current card to the EVGA 1080 FTW 8GB, and according to Game Debate's comparison app, you should have seen 56% faster frame rates out of the 1080.  Here's a link if anyone's interested:

http://www.game-debate.com/gpu/index.php?gid=3554&gid2=3081&compare=geforce-gtx-1080-evga-ftw-acx-3-0-8gb-edition-vs-radeon-r9-nano-4gb

I know the three cards I've bought in the last two years have yielded almost exactly the performance boost in both JNPG and TGC that the comparison chart predicted.  Weren't you originally seeing almost double the frame rates after you took your monitor out of freesync mode?  I'm just wondering what could have happened?

Yes, I was seeing very good framerates, almost double in SOME cases. However, the smoothness was nowhere near what the Nano/Freesync enabled looked like and strangely, I am getting better framerates with the Nano after hooking up the new monitor (OMG it is gorgeous!) and enabling Freesync. I almost held on to the 1080, but that would have meant I needed to invest $1300 in a G-sync monitor to get similar results as I am now and with a Radeon Pro Duo coming my way sometime in the very near future, I will be in hog heaven as the benches I have seen have the RPD up 20-40% over the 1080. The 1080 was and is a great card, but I just was not seeing the results I was hoping for.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2016, 09:38:46 AM by DivotMaker »
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stan_solo

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« Reply #36 on: October 12, 2016, 04:23:19 PM »
AMD  :   Radeon RX490  Graphic card

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AMD's Vega 10 flagship GPU will allegedly debut in the Radeon RX 490 by the end of this year. Alongside that AMD is reportedly also working on a new FPGA (field programmable gate-array) board code-named "Magnum" which can be configured as per the likes of the creator.

In regards to the rumored specifications, the Radeon RX 490 is an HBM2 powered card that will succeed the previous AMD behemoth - the R9 Fury X. It's said to house around 4096 Shader Processing Units and a ginormous 16GB of HBM2 VRAM. Total memory bandwidth is expected to be around 512GB/s and memory performance is expected to be market leading at 12 TFLOPS.

All these are rumors at this time however, so you should take this with a grain of salt. Even the RX 490 branding is rumored and is bound to change. Despite this there is growing evidence circulating that the upcoming flagship will make its debut in November or December of this year.

The AMD Radeon RX 490 will compete with Nvidia's upcoming powerhouse,  the GTX 1080 Ti, at the enthusiast end of the market. It's success will depend highly on the price to performance ratio here. We have little info so far regarding Nvidia's counterpart so it wouldn't be fair to do a comparison at this stage. We do believe that the GTX 1080 Ti will make its debut at CES in January 2017, a little late to the competition.

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DivotMaker

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« Reply #37 on: October 12, 2016, 04:25:57 PM »
AMD may be doing a 2 chip version of the 490X which would be their professional line, but could also be a gaming card SKU too.....
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stan_solo

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« Reply #38 on: October 18, 2016, 06:58:07 PM »
This is mind boggling and problematic as I'm saving for a rig and finding the right card in regards to price vs performance is going to be tricky

And we still have the Vega and Volta versions to come  .. although I suspect these will be high end gaming cards

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If you’ve ever shopped for a graphics card, and I’m presuming most of you have, you’ve probably ran into the wall of choices. And I’m just talking about whether to go GeForce or Radeon, or whether to pick up at an RX 460 or RX 470. No, I’m talking about the dozens upon dozens of variants of each and every individual graphics card, each with minute changes from one to another. Suddenly your bombarded by talk of TwinFrozr, copper heat pipes, chassis, and boost clocks. It’s confusing enough for us, but imagine what it’s like for complete newcomers to PC gaming.

Now, the end result of which graphics card you buy might not actually be all that important in the grand scheme of things. One might be a few percentage points faster than another. Or another may run totally silent. At the end of the day though, you’re getting a very slight variant of a single graphics card.

Let’s just pull out an example of how ridiculous it can get though. Take AMD’s Radeon RX 480. A great, popular card, sure. AMD add-in board partner XFX makes its own versions of the Radeon RX 480, including both the 8GB and 4GB models. The total number of RX 480 graphics available from XFX? 11. Seven 8GB variants and four 4GB versions. That’s a lot to take in and then to understand and know which is the best buy for you. As far as I can tell some models just come with slightly different coloured fans. Others have got some decent factory overclocks. At the end of the day though, they’re all just Radeon RX 480s.

So with all these minor changes between the graphics cards, you’d think it would be a simple case of picking the best one. But it’s not, as it turns out. Some promise markedly better performance, for a pretty hefty markup in price. Let’s take a look at MSI. To my knowledge they have four different GTX 1070’s. The cheapest is the Aero, which carries an MSRP of $419, while the most expensive is the Sea Hawk X, which will set you back $549. That’s over $130 more for what is the same core graphics card. By the time you get to the top end you’re really not far off a $600 GTX 1080. How is the average consumer expected to know which is the better buy.

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DivotMaker

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« Reply #39 on: October 18, 2016, 07:21:01 PM »
This is mind boggling and problematic as I'm saving for a rig and finding the right card in regards to price vs performance is going to be tricky

And we still have the Vega and Volta versions to come  .. although I suspect these will be high end gaming cards

***********************************************************************************************************************************************
If you’ve ever shopped for a graphics card, and I’m presuming most of you have, you’ve probably ran into the wall of choices. And I’m just talking about whether to go GeForce or Radeon, or whether to pick up at an RX 460 or RX 470. No, I’m talking about the dozens upon dozens of variants of each and every individual graphics card, each with minute changes from one to another. Suddenly your bombarded by talk of TwinFrozr, copper heat pipes, chassis, and boost clocks. It’s confusing enough for us, but imagine what it’s like for complete newcomers to PC gaming.

Now, the end result of which graphics card you buy might not actually be all that important in the grand scheme of things. One might be a few percentage points faster than another. Or another may run totally silent. At the end of the day though, you’re getting a very slight variant of a single graphics card.

Let’s just pull out an example of how ridiculous it can get though. Take AMD’s Radeon RX 480. A great, popular card, sure. AMD add-in board partner XFX makes its own versions of the Radeon RX 480, including both the 8GB and 4GB models. The total number of RX 480 graphics available from XFX? 11. Seven 8GB variants and four 4GB versions. That’s a lot to take in and then to understand and know which is the best buy for you. As far as I can tell some models just come with slightly different coloured fans. Others have got some decent factory overclocks. At the end of the day though, they’re all just Radeon RX 480s.

So with all these minor changes between the graphics cards, you’d think it would be a simple case of picking the best one. But it’s not, as it turns out. Some promise markedly better performance, for a pretty hefty markup in price. Let’s take a look at MSI. To my knowledge they have four different GTX 1070’s. The cheapest is the Aero, which carries an MSRP of $419, while the most expensive is the Sea Hawk X, which will set you back $549. That’s over $130 more for what is the same core graphics card. By the time you get to the top end you’re really not far off a $600 GTX 1080. How is the average consumer expected to know which is the better buy.

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Wait for Vega and Volta.....especially for DX12.....
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stan_solo

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« Reply #40 on: October 18, 2016, 07:30:26 PM »
Wait for Vega and Volta.....especially for DX12.....

yes .. it will be interesting what they bring to the table

As for TGC 2 , I assume they will release in DX 11    .... and maybe DX 12 and Vulkan further down the road

DivotMaker

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« Reply #41 on: October 18, 2016, 07:37:49 PM »
Wait for Vega and Volta.....especially for DX12.....

yes .. it will be interesting what they bring to the table

As for TGC 2 , I assume they will release in DX 11    .... and maybe DX 12 and Vulkan further down the road
If they ever release in DX12 or Vulkan, AMD will have the edge as of now.....
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stan_solo

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« Reply #42 on: October 27, 2016, 09:46:56 AM »
AMD  : Zen processor

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AMD has confirmed during a Q3 2016 company earnings call that its next-generation Zen CPU architecture will launch in Q1 2017. Zen has been a long time coming and suffered numerous delays, but AMD CEO Lisa Su is confident it will launch in the first three months of 2017, while it expects demand for the initial high-end Summit Ridge processors will be high.

"With Summit Ridge launching in Q1 of 2017 I guess, how would you expect the channel to ramp that? Do you see it ramping pretty fully in the first couple of quarters of the year, or are you looking for more normal PC seasonality?", said Chris Hemmelgarn, a Barclays bank representative.

Su responded and said "I would expect there will be a relatively good initial demand for Summit Ridge that may be not quite at the seasonal patterns.

"Summit Ridge is playing in a space in the high-end desktop that we currently aren't offering a product. So we believe we'll be competitive certainly with [Intel] Core i5 as well as Core i7 and we will be launching in those areas".

Good news for AMD fans then, who have been waiting years now for new high-end processors from Team Red. With an early 2017 launch pencilled in it’s looking very likely we'll be seeing Zen CPUs crop up at CES 2017 in January.

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HB_KeithC

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« Reply #43 on: October 27, 2016, 10:36:49 AM »
At yesterday's Windows 10 event, MS announced that the Xbox One will be getting Bitstream audio pass-through, including Dolby Atmos.  It will be available on all Xbox One consoles through the Blu-ray player in a future update.

http://www.gamespot.com/articles/xbox-one-adding-dolby-atmos-audio-in-future-update/1100-6444829/

stan_solo

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« Reply #44 on: October 28, 2016, 10:59:32 AM »
PS4 Pro news     .... awful advert

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The marketing blitz for the upgraded PlayStation 4 has finally begun, although the first ad is not quite what you’d expect.
The PS4 Pro, Sony’s upgraded PlayStation 4 console, is out in just two weeks, but you’d hardly believe it given the lack of marketing Sony has had for it so far.
All that has changed with the ad below, although it’s as much for Call Of Duty: Infinite Warfare’s Zombies mode as it is for the actual console.
The fact that this Zombies is set in the ‘80s (it even stars David Hasselhoff) is the reason the ad is the way it is. Although it’s a fun glimpse at what Sony adverts might have been like if the PlayStation had been around in the ‘80s.

Although closely associated with the Xbox 360 last generation, the Call Of Duty franchise jumped ship to favour the PlayStation this generation. And as the ad points out, Sony now gets first dibs on DLC and other extras.
Getting a head start with Call Of Duty players is obvious a big coup for Sony, but presumably other ads will actually explain what the PS4 Pro is and what it can do.
The PS4 Pro will be released in the UK on November 10, for £350.


Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2016/10/28/the-first-ps4-pro-ad-is-80s-themed-thanks-to-call-of-duty-6220530/#ixzz4OO7oKPEu

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